The Science Report

by Stuart Gary

World’s first copulation act rooted out

I’ve just written a story for ABC Science about the discovery that having sex through copulation by internal fertilisation first began 385 million years ago, according to a new study of an extinct  Devonian age armoured fish called Microbrachius dicki which is a kind of Antiarch placoderm.

A.placoderms were the first animals with jaws.

The new findings places the origins of internal fertilisation far earlier than previously thought, at the beginning of vertebrate evolution.

If you missed my radio report on the story and want to find out more, check out the online version at: 

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/10/20/4109305.htm

The Science Report

by Stuart Gary

World’s first copulation act rooted out

I’ve just written a story for ABC Science about the discovery that having sex through copulation by internal fertilisation first began 385 million years ago, according to a new study of an extinct Devonian age armoured fish called Microbrachius dicki which is a kind of Antiarch placoderm.

A.placoderms were the first animals with jaws.

The new findings places the origins of internal fertilisation far earlier than previously thought, at the beginning of vertebrate evolution.

If you missed my radio report on the story and want to find out more, check out the online version at:

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/10/20/4109305.htm

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sci-universe:

Here are some pictures from India’s Mangalyaan spacecraft.

Oh and here’s the stereotype-breaking picture showing a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success:

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mapsontheweb:

Civil Unrest Index, 2014

mapsontheweb:

Civil Unrest Index, 2014

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fyeahastropics:

Lunation Credit & Copyright: Antnio Cidadƒo
Explanation: Our Moon’s appearance changes nightly. This time-lapse sequence shows what our Moon looks like during a lunation, a complete lunar cycle. As the Moon orbits the Earth, the half illuminated by the Sun first becomes increasingly visible, then decreasingly visible. The Moon always keeps the same face toward the Earth. The Moon's apparent size changes slightly, though, and a slight wobble called a libration is discernable as it progresses along its elliptical orbit. During the cycle, sunlight reflects from the Moon at different angles, and so illuminates different features differently. A full lunation takes about 29.5 days, just under a month (moon-th).

fyeahastropics:

Lunation 
Credit & Copyright: Antnio Cidadƒo

Explanation: Our Moon’s appearance changes nightly. This time-lapse sequence shows what our Moon looks like during a lunation, a complete lunar cycle. As the Moon orbits the Earth, the half illuminated by the Sun first becomes increasingly visible, then decreasingly visible. The Moon always keeps the same face toward the Earth. The Moon's apparent size changes slightly, though, and a slight wobble called a libration is discernable as it progresses along its elliptical orbit. During the cycle, sunlight reflects from the Moon at different angles, and so illuminates different features differently. A full lunation takes about 29.5 days, just under a month (moon-th).

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spaceplasma:

"Since, in the long run, every planetary civilization will be endangered by impacts from space, every surviving civilization is obliged to become spacefaring — not because of exploratory or romantic zeal, but for the most practical reason imaginable: staying alive… If our long-term survival is at stake, we have a basic responsibility to our species to venture to other worlds." 
— Carl Sagan - Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space (Chapter 21, p.371 )

spaceplasma:

"Since, in the long run, every planetary civilization will be endangered by impacts from space, every surviving civilization is obliged to become spacefaring — not because of exploratory or romantic zeal, but for the most practical reason imaginable: staying alive… If our long-term survival is at stake, we have a basic responsibility to our species to venture to other worlds." 

Carl Sagan - Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space (Chapter 21, p.371 )

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into-theuniverse:

Star Cluster Melotte 15 in the Heart Nebula // IC 1805

into-theuniverse:

Star Cluster Melotte 15 in the Heart Nebula // IC 1805

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humanoidhistory:

The planet Neptune as seen from its moon Triton, illustration composited from images taken by the Voyager space probe. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

The planet Neptune as seen from its moon Triton, illustration composited from images taken by the Voyager space probe. (NASA)

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spacetracks:

#Comet #SidingSpring will make its close flyby of #Mars ~11:27 PT today!
Watch it on: Slooh webcast
Image: (NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope)

spacetracks:

#Comet #SidingSpring will make its close flyby of #Mars ~11:27 PT today!

Watch it on: Slooh webcast

Image: (NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope)

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astroperlas:

Marte visto por la sonda MOM (Mangalyaan) (ISRO).

astroperlas:

Marte visto por la sonda MOM (Mangalyaan) (ISRO).

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spaceplasma:

July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin descending the ladder and stepping onto the Moon.  Neil Armstrong's “one small step” onto the lunar surface was actually a 3-foot jump down off the lunar module’s ladder to the ground.

Credit: NASA

spaceplasma:

July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin descending the ladder and stepping onto the Moon.  Neil Armstrong's “one small step” onto the lunar surface was actually a 3-foot jump down off the lunar module’s ladder to the ground.

Credit: NASA

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jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.
As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.
Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.
That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.
And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.

As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.

Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.

That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.

And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

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8bitfuture:

Photos: The shuttle Endeavour.

I was lucky enough to get to see this in LA recently, where it’s on display at the California Science Center. The cargo bay doors were open while they installed a new payload inside.

Read more space stories at 8 Bit Future.

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